TB Facts logo

TB Statistics – Global, regional, age & high burden

National TB statistics

With national TB statistics there will generally be two main types of TB statistics. There will be reports of actual cases, which is the minimum number of people affected, but these TB statistics are of limited use if many cases go unreported. There are also estimates, which are based on surveys, and they are often used to give the proportion of people living with TB. There will always be various assumptions made in compiling estimates, which is why they can sometimes provide very different figures from the TB statistics based on reported cases.

TB statistics and indeed the statistics for other diseases, will often refer to the incidence and prevalence of a disease. The TB incidence is the number of new cases of active TB disease in a population during a certain time period (usually a year). The cases of TB page gives the estimated incidence of almost every country in the world. The TB prevalence is the number of people in the population who are living with active TB. Prevalence is usually, but not always given as a percentage of the population.1“Basic Statistics: About Incidence, Prevalence, Morbidity, and Mortality – Statistics Teaching Tools”, Department of Health, New York State www.health.ny.gov/diseases/chronic/basicstat.htm

Global TB statistics

TB related deaths

In 2015 an estimated 1.4 million people who were HIV negative died of TB.

In addition there were 0.4 million deaths resulting from TB disease among people who were HIV positive. So there were a total of 1.8 million TB related deaths. TB is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. People who have both TB and HIV when they die, are internationally classified as having died from HIV. There is more about TB & HIV co-infection.

TB deaths compared with HIV deaths

In 2015 there were a total of 1.1 million HIV related deaths.2“Fact Sheet – Latest Statistics on the Status of the AIDS Epidemic”,UNAIDS, www.unaids.org/en/resources/fact-sheet

The 1.1 million HIV related deaths compares with 1.4 million people dying from TB. So TB now annually causes more deaths worldwide than HIV.

The global TB statistics show that in 2015 an estimated 170,000 children died of TB

The global TB statistics show that in 2015 an estimated 170,000 children died of TB ©Tobias Hofsäss

TB disease

There were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of TB disease (also known as active TB)  in 2015 and this included 1.2 million among HIV positive people. There were an estimated 3.5 million cases among women. There were also an estimated 1.0 million cases of TB in children and 170,000 children died of TB (excluding children with HIV).

TB incidence rate and CFR

TB incidence rates have fallen since 2000. However, the global rate of decline in the TB incidence rate was only 1.5% from 2014 to 2015 and the CFR (case fatality rate or case fatality ratio) in 2015 was 17%. The CFR is approximately the number of TB deaths divided by the TB incidence in the same year. It is conventionally expressed as a percentage and represents a measure of risk.3“Case fatality rate”, Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Case_fatality_rate

TB in India

Estimates of the burden of TB disease in India have been revised upwards substantially by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for the period 2000 – 2015. This follows evidence from surveys and other means that the previous estimates of cases and deaths was too low. As the country with the highest burden of TB disease in the world, these revisions have had a major impact on the global estimates. The estimates for India are still though considered interim.

Drug resistant TB

There were also in 2015 an estimated 480,000 new cases of multi drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) and an additional 100,000 people with rifampicin resistant TB (RR-TB). People with rifampicin resistant TB are now eligible for the same treatment as people with MDR TB. Drug resistant TB is now an increasing problem in the worldwide control of TB.

Dying of TB

When the number of deaths becomes as large as 1.4 million, it can be hard to really understand what it means. So to further develop your understanding of what it is like, please read about dying of TB.

Regional TB statistics

All countries are asked to report their TB figures to the WHO. WHO then use these notified figures to help produce estimated total TB statistics for each country, region, globally and by age. Globally it is thought that fewer than two-thirds (63%) of TB cases are notified. The WHO figures for the estimated incidence and number of deaths from TB in each WHO region are given below.

Estimated WHO Regional TB statistics for 2015
Region HIV negative TB Mortality HIV positive TB Mortality Total TB Incidence HIV positive TB Incidence Population
Africa 450,000 300,000 2,720,000 834,000 989,000,000
Americas 19,000 5,900 268,000 32,000 991,000,000
Eastern Mediterranean 80,000 3,000 749,000 13,000 648,000,000
Europe 32,000 4,900 323,000 27,000 910,000,000
South-East Asia 710,000 74,000 4,740,000 227,000 1,930,000,000
Western Pacific 89,000 5,700 1,590,000 34,000 1,860,000,000
Global Total 1,400,000 390,000 10,400,000 1,170,000 7,320,000,000

People who had both TB and HIV infection at the time of their death, are internationally classified as having died of HIV. There is more information and statistics about HIV and TB co-infection.

Estimated WHO TB mortality statistics for 2015 by age & region
Region Total TB Mortality 0 – 14 years TB Mortality Male >15 years Female >15 years Population
Africa 743,000 97,500 416,000 230,000 989,000,000
Americas 24,390 2,370 15,570 6,490 991,000,000
Eastern Mediterranean 82,770 10,810 51,160 20,747 648,000,000
Europe 36,970 568 22,190 14,230 910,000,000
South-East Asia 786,300 90,000 496,500 199,600 1,930,000,000
Western Pacific 95,250 8,570 61,850 24,830 1,860,000,000
Global Total 1,769,000 210,000 1,062,000 496,000 7,320,000,000

It is estimated that in some developing countries up to ten percent of human tuberculosis is due to bovine TB.

TB statistics for “high burden” countries

Of all the countries that report their TB statistics to WHO, there are 22 countries that were referred to as the TB “high burden” countries. These countries had been prioritized at a global level since 2000. Between them they accounted for 83% of all estimated incident cases of TB worldwide in 2014. In addition to the main list there were two other lists, a list of high burden TB/HIV co-infection countries, and a third list of high burden MDR-TB countries.

In 2015 it was decided by WHO that the lists would be revised but that there would still be three lists. Each list would contain 30 countries. There is more about this on the TB “high burden” countries page.

The following is the estimated burden of TB for each of the 30 countries in the main high TB burden list.

Statistics for TB in “High Burden” Countries 2015
Country HIV negative TB Mortality HIV Positive TB Mortality Total TB Incidence HIV positive TB Incidence Population
Angola 11,000 7,200 93,000 28,000 25,000,000
Bangladesh 73,000 230 362,000 630 161,000,000
Brazil 5,500 2,200 84,000 13,000 208,000,000
Cambodia 8,600 440 59,000 1,400 15,600,000
Central African Republic 2,200 2,700 19,000 8,600 4,900,000
China 35,000 2,600 918,000 15,000 1,380,000,000
Congo 2,300 2,400 18,000 6,400 4,620,000
DPR Korea 15,000 40 141,000 450 25,200,000
DP Congo 51,000 16,000 250,000 39,000 77,300,000
Ethiopia 25,000 3,900 191,000 16,000 99,400,000
India 480,000 37,000 2,840,000 113,000 1,310,000,000
Indonesia 100,000 26,000 1,020,000 78,000 258,000,000
Kenya 9,000 7,200 107,000 36,000 46,100,000
Lesotho 1,200 4,800 17,000 12,000 2,140,000
Liberia 3,200 840 14,000 1,800 4,500,000
Mozambique 21,000 34,000 154,000 79,000 28,200,000
Myanmar 27,000 4,800 197,000 17,000 53,900,000
Namibia 780 880 12,000 4,900 2,460,000
Nigeria 180,000 57,000 586,000 100,000 182,000,000
Pakistan 44,000 1,600 510,000 8,800 189,000,000
Papua New Guinea 3,100 670 33,000 4,900 7,620,000
Philippines 14,000 440 324,000 4,300 101,000,000
Russian Federation 15,000 1,500 115,000 11,000 143,000,000
Sierra Leone 3,300 820 20,000 2,600 6,450,000
South Africa 25,000 73,000 454,000 258,000 54,500,000
Thailand 8,400 5,400 117,000 15,000 68,000,000
UR Tanzania 30,000 25,000 164,000 57,000 53,500,000
Viet Nam 16,000 1,100 128,000 5,500 93,400,000
Zambia 5,000 12,000 63,000 38,000 16,200,000
Zimbabwe 1,700 6,300 38,000 26,000 15,600,000
Total for High Burden Countries 1,200,000 340,000 9,050,000 1,000,000 4,630,000,000

There are more TB Statistics for India, TB Statistics for South Africa, TB Statistics for the United States and TB statistics for England.

You can read more about:

TB prevention

or Tests for TB.

Major source for TB statistics

Global Tuberculosis Control 2016, WHO, Geneva, 2016 www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/

References

   [ + ]

1. “Basic Statistics: About Incidence, Prevalence, Morbidity, and Mortality – Statistics Teaching Tools”, Department of Health, New York State www.health.ny.gov/diseases/chronic/basicstat.htm
2. “Fact Sheet – Latest Statistics on the Status of the AIDS Epidemic”,UNAIDS, www.unaids.org/en/resources/fact-sheet
3. “Case fatality rate”, Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Case_fatality_rate